Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,926
    Total Downloaded
    49.01 MB

    How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    This is a topic that I've noticed comes up pretty regularly so as I've done one today I thought I'd take a few photos along the way. Hopefully this will give some of you a sense of what's involved. Bear in mind that this is just the way I do it and I'm all ears if anybody has any better procedures.

    The first step is to remove the head from the bike. This is a must in my opinion. I know that some have done this with the head in place but I wouldn't even attempt it. Get the head off and on a bench where you can see what you're doing and have much more space to work. The head removal is straightforward - tank off, exhaust off, rocker gear off and pushrods out, throttle body/manifold off then loosen the four screws and there you have the head in your hands. You need to be able to secure the head and adjust the position so you can work efficiently. The first photo shows a steel bar that has a 12mm x 1.25mm thread cut onto it to screw into the spark plug hole as this is a Twin Cam head, I have another for Evos which is 14mm x 1.25mm. You'll really struggle if you don't have something like this.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150239.jpg 
Views:	144 
Size:	72.6 KB 
ID:	29699

    Once you've screwed the rod into the plug hole, clamp the rod in a vice like this so that you have access to the broken stud.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150240.jpg 
Views:	144 
Size:	117.4 KB 
ID:	29700

    The stud is always uneven where it's snapped so I use a grinder to smooth the surface. This increases the chance of a clean start when you go to drill the stud out. It doesn't have to be like glass, as long it's it's something like flat.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150206.jpg 
Views:	144 
Size:	95.5 KB 
ID:	29701

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150207.jpg 
Views:	140 
Size:	88.6 KB 
ID:	29702

    Here is where you need to spend some money - you need one of these tools. It's an exhaust stud removal jig and I bought this one years ago when only Jim's made them. There are a few different companies doing them nowadays, all cheaper than Jim's. Look at Georges-garage.com or CFU-TOOLS on Ebay and you'll probably get one for 60 or 70 quid. They're well worth the investment, I wouldn't attempt this job without one. If you drill off centre to the stud then you've got big problems. Simple enough tool but you need one good stud to be able to use it. It slips over the good stud, locates into the exhaust port and positions the other hole over the snapped stud. Just use an exhaust nut to lock it in place.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150210.jpg 
Views:	141 
Size:	82.5 KB 
ID:	29703

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150212.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	70.0 KB 
ID:	29704

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150211.jpg 
Views:	143 
Size:	99.5 KB 
ID:	29705

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150213.jpg 
Views:	143 
Size:	99.6 KB 
ID:	29706

    Now it's time to drill the remainder of the stud out. You can now position the head in the vice wherever it's comfy for you to apply pressure. The jig has a steel guide through the hole where the drill goes to keep it straight. I use a sharpened drill bit and a cordless drill with a slow speed option. This is a painfully slow process, it takes at least a couple of hours the way I do it. It probably could be done in one go but I've never tried. I use lots of cutting fluid and drill at a slow speed with lots of pressure on the drill. If the drill has an adjustable clutch then set it on the light side. The bit will snatch sometimes and if you break it you're in trouble. I drill for a few minutes at a time then stop, unscrew the jig and clean the hole out then repeat this for as long as it takes until you break through the end of the stud. Don't get in a hurry, it's not worth it. Eventually you'll get to this stage where you've drilled through nearly an inch of steel stud. You're now finished with the drilling fixture.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150217.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	101.6 KB 
ID:	29707

    You might think I'm OCD on this step but I'm all for good preparation when the job involves any risk as threading the new hole does. I like to have the tap vertical for the tapping process so I use a level gauge to set the head up in the vice. Go off centre while tapping the new thread and the studs won't be parallel to each other. Better safe than sorry.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150219.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	85.8 KB 
ID:	29708

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150220.jpg 
Views:	144 
Size:	106.1 KB 
ID:	29709

    As with drilling the hole, tapping the new thread is a slow time consuming operation. Use a sharp 5/16" x 18 TPI tap and again use plenty of cutting fluid and stop regularly to clean the threads out. I use a starter tap and then go through again with a bottom tap. Remember that you're tapping into the remainder of the old stud which is steel so it's very hard. Don't try to rush. Take your time. A quarter turn then at least half a turn back for a couple of threads at a time then clean the cuttings out.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150221.jpg 
Views:	140 
Size:	88.7 KB 
ID:	29710

    After a while (a long while) you'll get to this stage. A nice straight, clean threaded hole.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150223.jpg 
Views:	141 
Size:	99.1 KB 
ID:	29711

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150225.jpg 
Views:	143 
Size:	79.8 KB 
ID:	29712

    Now you can fit your new stud. Make sure that all of the cutting fluid and cuttings are out of the hole and that it's completely dry. I'm in the habit of using Loctite 272 on the stud. It may be wrong but that's just my way. Use two exhaust nuts together to grip the stud and then wind it in. You can use the other stud as a guide for the depth - anywhere around 0.96 inches will be fine.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150226.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	56.4 KB 
ID:	29713

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150227.jpg 
Views:	141 
Size:	82.9 KB 
ID:	29714

    That's all there is to it. The new stud should be straight and parallel to the old one.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150230.jpg 
Views:	140 
Size:	87.0 KB 
ID:	29715

    Now is a good time to drop an exhaust clamp over them so you won't have a nasty surprise after you've got the head back in place.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1150231.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	93.2 KB 
ID:	29716

    There's a lot of work involved in doing this. Now you all understand why it's essential to get the head off of the bike!

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    10,293
    Total Downloaded
    40.75 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Excellent post Alex, thank you for sharing your skills.
    Much less involved.....

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,038
    Total Downloaded
    21.02 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    That's not OCD Alex, that's a job done properly. Just two points, I'd PERSONALLY question the use of the Loctite. My thinking is that if the nut seizes on the stud, then it just might unscrew the complete stud- HOPEFULLY! Also, I'd use bress nuts when putting it all back together. I bow down to your superior knowledge, you being the engineer & all. Your thoughts on my comments please, Alex.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,960
    Total Downloaded
    12.83 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Quote Originally Posted by kevscrivener View Post
    Excellent post Alex, thank you for sharing your skills.
    I'll second that.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,831
    Total Downloaded
    107.69 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Excellent post. I have a suggestion to make. If you had a second drill guide insert about 1/8" diameter and used this first to drill a pilot hole...then swithed it for the final one. I reckon that stud would be out in a couple of minutes.

    Brian.
    100 Anniversary Road King Classic.

    Anglia Region 15 member.

    My old man always said if it has tits or tyres...it'll be trouble...and he was right.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,405
    Total Downloaded
    334.6 KB

    How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Good work Alex. They can be buggers to remove, smashed easy out trying myself.
    Last edited by Charlie Brown; 27-10-2017 at 10:51 AM.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    112
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Brown View Post
    Good work Alex. They can be buggers to remove, smashed easy out trying myself.
    Never had any success with easyout(stud extracters). They push outwards as you turn and I think they put more pressure outwards and the stud grips more. Maybe the bigger the stud the more chance of success.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,878
    Total Downloaded
    29.27 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Great stuff - you could do a Harleys for Dummies type book Alex, like me!

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,926
    Total Downloaded
    49.01 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. pitts View Post
    I'd PERSONALLY question the use of the Loctite. My thinking is that if the nut seizes on the stud, then it just might unscrew the complete stud- HOPEFULLY!
    Yeah that makes sense with a steel nut, I've had a few studs come out still attached to the nut myself. I do use brass nuts but I forgot to end the post with that suggestion! If a brass nut is used on a stud held in with Loctite, the stud should stay put and the nut should unscrew easily. Famous last words eh ...

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,926
    Total Downloaded
    49.01 MB

    Re: How to - Exhaust stud removal.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr B View Post
    If you had a second drill guide insert about 1/8" diameter and used this first to drill a pilot hole...then swithed it for the final one. I reckon that stud would be out in a couple of minutes.
    That's a good plan Brian. I'd be worried about the pilot drill bit breaking though. I broke one years ago getting in a rush and it was a real pain to get it out. As it broke below the head surface I had to build it up with TIG and weld a nut on top. I don't know which grade of steel the studs are made of, pretty hard stuff though...
    Last edited by Fast Lane; 27-10-2017 at 10:56 PM. Reason: Irritating little emoji thing appearing every time I type the word 'idea'

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •