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Thread: Underware

  1. #1
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    Underware

    Just the right sort of underware is required if one expects to do any heavy lifting with reasonable expectations of holding things in place.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cent...w=1304&bih=665




    I'm wondering how many people are running these things.
    And the results of their experiences with the device.
    Did you rip it off after your bike fell over?
    Do you collect admiring glances from envious riders who, through prudence or lack of pluck, are unwilling to tempt the laws of physics?
    Is it a proper exercise to rupture yourself?
    How many curses (and what sort, for I'm always willing to learn new ways to express the un-expressable.... I don't know why, but it is so) were issued before you found the 'nack'?

    I, for one, will be. The old 'H' model, p/n 49400-59A.
    https://www.ebay.com/p/1324739810

    Because dammit, the old girl looks soooo fine when 'poised' vertical like that.
    With a different set-up for retention, instead of that piddly-arse clip.
    I found that putting the bike on the jiffy-stand first is the way that makes it easy to tug up.

    When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout!

    A common mistake made when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

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  2. #2
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    Re: Underware

    The old Duo onwards stand could jolt free if the spring clip has got tired, very noisy but usually no great tradgedy (unless charging down a motorway - Freeway for Skip, Autobahn for Hippy! - with your music on and a hundred miles later you find instead of a stand you have two razor sharp spikes!). Fred Warr used to put an FLH on the stand single handed by rolling backwards and treading stand down, a trick that should be mastered by lots of practise with a mate and only under the best conditions - ie; surface, angle of road and degree of alcohol consumed.

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  3. #3
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    Re: Underware

    Do you remember the "police ride-off stand", looked a bit like some wheelbarrow handles that pivoted just under the footboards of an FLP, one each side (with adjustable ends) - the idea was a cop could park the bike with the engine running and if the car made off as he walked towards it he could just leap back on and drop the clutch. I know at least one member had them fitted back in the seventies.

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  4. #4
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    Re: Underware

    I'd fergot all about the coppers ride-off. Saw it done once. An impressive 2 1/2 second rodeo. Shoulda called it buck-n-go.





    p.s. bully for Fred. Apparently he knew enough to let the bike do the work.

    When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout!

    A common mistake made when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  5. #5
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    Re: Underware

    I was given one of these and although I did fit it to see if it did indeed fit I took it straight off again as I didn't think much of the retaining powers of the retaining clip. Also being five foot six tall (short ? ) and nine stone soaking wet I didn't think much of my chances of actually lifting the Duo on to it.
    In the parts book the stand is referred to as a "service stand" part number 49400-59A .I had thought it was put on the bike when it was in the shop for a service not for use out on the road,wrong again.
    In 1980 when I first got my Ironhead I saw another 1980 Sportster fitted only with a centre stand which looked to go too far over centre as both wheels were still firmly on the ground. The owner was very keen to swap for my side stand but there was no chance of that. It's not in the parts book so how it turned up on a new bike I don't know.

    Ron.

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  6. #6
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    Re: Underware

    Thanks for the reply Ron. I'd heard rumors about the Sporty c/s being just the other side of useless.

    'Service' stand...... yes indeedy! Just the thing for fixing a (rear) flat..... and a front one too if you've got someone to sit aft; or even if you aren't two-up , for the bike can, without arguing with you about it, be gently let down to rest (use a block or a crate or sumthin to protect the fender (or mudguard for Paul).
    I'm conjuring up a spring-loaded catch to hold the thing in place.
    The trick, and it IS a trick, is to let the bike hoist itself. It involves pulling back on the left h-bar while the bike is on the side-stand while rolling back about 3 inches while pressing your foot down on the stand while giving the bike a slight heave to the right (with the left h-bar and right thigh). If done right the bike will, seemingly, pivot itself on the left leg of the stand while the momentum of rolling back and the nudge-to-the-right takes it up.... and presto!
    A lot of 'whiles' to all that, I know. But if them petite Motor Maids could manage it................
    A caution: Straddle the bike to bring it off; preferably with the side-stand down.

    When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout!

    A common mistake made when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

    Join the Harley-Davidson Riders Club Great Britain

  7. #7
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    Re: Underware

    Quote Originally Posted by last shovel View Post
    Thanks for the reply Ron. I'd heard rumors about the Sporty c/s being just the other side of useless.
    Definitely.

    I was given one some years ago which I put aside for fitting on the Ironhead once I restored it. Research indicated that in the "down" position, the centre stand allows both wheels to be in full contact with the ground, which is hardly ideal; whilst also being too narrow to afford stability on anything bar a billiard table surface. Furthermore they adversely affect the already limited ground clearance.

    Thankfully, a few years later they became fashionable Stateside, with replica ones selling for over $100; so I was happy to export mine back whence it came in exchange for a decent fistful of greenbacks.
    Much less involved.....

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